Why am I not allowed to donate blood?

I studied in Europe for four years in the 80′s recently I decided to be a good citizen and donate blood (yesterday).

I was told that anyone who spent 4 years in certain countries in the 80′s is not allowed to be a blood donor.

I wonder who the Europeans get their blood from?

It depends on where you lived and the cumulative time you were there. To simply quote the American Red Cross

Any person who lived in certain parts of the world during certain times are unable to donate due to the risk of the human variant of Mad Cow Disease. The human variant is called variant Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease (vCJD) which is also a fatal brain disease. Scientists believe that vCJD is Mad Cow Disease that has somehow transferred to humans, possibly through the food chain.

There is now evidence from a small number of case reports involving patients and laboratory animal studies that vCJD can be transmitted through transfusion. There is no test for vCJD in humans that could be used to screen blood donors and to protect the blood supply. This means that blood programs must take special precautions to keep vCJD out of the blood supply by avoiding collections from those who have been where this disease is found.

At this time, the American Red Cross donor eligibility rules related to vCJD are as follows:

You are not eligible to donate if:

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From January 1, 1980, through December 31, 1996, you spent (visited or lived) a cumulative time of 3 months or more, in the United Kingdom (UK), or
From January 1, 1980, to present, you had a blood transfusion in any country(ies) in the (UK). The UK includes any of the countries listed below.

Channel Islands
England
Falkland Islands
Gibraltar
Isle of Man
Northern Ireland
Scotland
Wales
You were a member of the of the U.S. military, a civilian military employee, or a dependent of a member of the U.S. military who spent a total time of 6 months on or associated with a military base in any of the following areas during the specified time frames

From 1980 through 1990 – Belgium, the Netherlands (Holland), or Germany
From 1980 through 1996 – Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy or Greece.
You spent (visited or lived) a cumulative time of 5 years or more from January 1, 1980, to present, in any combination of country(ies) in Europe, including

in the UK from 1980 through 1996 as listed in above
on or associated with military bases as described above, and
in other countries in Europe as listed below:
Albania
Austria
Belgium
Bosnia/Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Croatia
Czech Republic
Denmark
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland (Republic of)
Italy
Kosovo (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
Liechtenstein
Luxembourg
Macedonia
Montenegro (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
Netherlands (Holland)
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Serbia (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
Slovak Republic (Slovakia)
Slovenia
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
Yugoslavia (Federal Republic includes Kosovo, Montenegro, and Serbia)

90 comments to Why am I not allowed to donate blood?

  • ?

    obviously there is a problem with mad cow disease.
    what’s not known is how long you can have the infection without symptoms.
    somehow i’m guessing that you’d not want blood from someone from Swaziland.
    in the same way, i’d prefer that your blood not be mixed in with that national blood supply.
    i’ll be more than happy to grant that the comparison is not nearly fair.
    but i hope you get the idea.

    References :
    http://www.avert.org/worlstatinfo.htm
    < >

  • pbear i

    rules are rules
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    References :

  • David E

    It depends on where you lived and the cumulative time you were there. To simply quote the American Red Cross

    Any person who lived in certain parts of the world during certian times are unable to donate due to the risk of the human variant of Mad Cow Disease. The human variant is called variant Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease (vCJD) which is also a fatal brain disease. Scientists believe that vCJD is Mad Cow Disease that has somehow transferred to humans, possibly through the food chain.

    There is now evidence from a small number of case reports involving patients and laboratory animal studies that vCJD can be transmitted through transfusion. There is no test for vCJD in humans that could be used to screen blood donors and to protect the blood supply. This means that blood programs must take special precautions to keep vCJD out of the blood supply by avoiding collections from those who have been where this disease is found.

    At this time, the American Red Cross donor eligibility rules related to vCJD are as follows:

    You are not eligible to donate if:

    From January 1, 1980, through December 31, 1996, you spent (visited or lived) a cumulative time of 3 months or more, in the United Kingdom (UK), or
    From January 1, 1980, to present, you had a blood transfusion in any country(ies) in the (UK). The UK includes any of the countries listed below.

    Channel Islands
    England
    Falkland Islands
    Gibraltar
    Isle of Man
    Northern Ireland
    Scotland
    Wales
    You were a member of the of the U.S. military, a civilian military employee, or a dependent of a member of the U.S. military who spent a total time of 6 months on or associated with a military base in any of the following areas during the specified time frames

    From 1980 through 1990 – Belgium, the Netherlands (Holland), or Germany
    From 1980 through 1996 – Spain, Portugal, Turkey, Italy or Greece.
    You spent (visited or lived) a cumulative time of 5 years or more from January 1, 1980, to present, in any combination of country(ies) in Europe, including

    in the UK from 1980 through 1996 as listed in above
    on or associated with military bases as described above, and
    in other countries in Europe as listed below:
    Albania
    Austria
    Belgium
    Bosnia/Herzegovina
    Bulgaria
    Croatia
    Czech Republic
    Denmark
    Finland
    France
    Germany
    Greece
    Hungary
    Ireland (Republic of)
    Italy
    Kosovo (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
    Liechtenstein
    Luxembourg
    Macedonia
    Montenegro (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
    Netherlands (Holland)
    Norway
    Poland
    Portugal
    Romania
    Serbia (Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)
    Slovak Republic (Slovakia)
    Slovenia
    Spain
    Sweden
    Switzerland
    Turkey
    Yugoslavia (Federal Republic includes Kosovo, Montenegro, and Serbia)

    References :
    http://www.redcross.org/services/biomed/0,1082,0_557_,00.html#vcjd

  • Hi, cool post. I have been wondering about this topic,so thanks for writing.

  • The article on antibiotics are very good.

  • Chris

    I think the bigger problem here is the fact that we as military members and their families are no longer allowed to donate blood (I live in Korea and if we have visited north of Seoul we also cannot donate-my husband is eliminated three times over because we served in Europe and Iraq), but no one is telling us that we are at risk for anything. I find that extremely disturbing. Hardly anyone can donate blood at a drive here, but no one says, “hey, you need to watch out for these possible symptoms.” Or, “because you are at risk (they don’t always tell you for what–the North of Seoul thing was because of mosquitoes) you should take these precautions.” No one warned us that a disease was possible by visiting the military sponsored DMZ tour.
    While I understand rules are rules and you don’t want our blood (unless it is spilled protecting you), your answers are no only callus, but rude. We spend our entire lives dedicated to the protection of this country and the sacrifices we make are beyond anything a civilian could imagine. Try to be a little more compassionate in your judgment of the military. She was just trying to give blood for crying out loud and just wanted an answer.

  • Marijane

    My mother called me right before there was a big blood drive at my college. She informed me that I’d never be able to give blood because of the nuc plant explosion. SO, though it is stupid that I am unable to help in a needy area, I’d rather not infect someone with something that I may or may not have.

  • Linda N

    I understand the not being able to give blood thing… this has been my issue for at least 10 years that I have experienced (military in Germany from 1980 to 1982), but I would like to know if I can be a bone marrow donor?
    Thanks for any input, this information is hard to come by…

  • Dave N

    The assumpton is that no-one in the USA could possibly have come into contact with ‘Mad Cow Disease’ unless they had visited any of the countries lited. The sad part is it is a ridiculous assumption since ‘Mad Cow Disease’ has been around in the United States as long as anywhere else, it was (and still is) called by a different name – In the USA cattle that are unble to stand (as in Mad Cows Disease’ are simply called ‘downers’ and less than 2% are actually tested for the disease (something the French insisted on doing during the 80′s also). By not acknowledgeing the existence of ‘Mad Cow Disease’ in their countries, the USA and France both used it’s existence elsewhere as an excuse for blatant protectionism and the banning of the importation of Beef and Beef products.

  • ash

    Im pissed but its not like i can do anything. I get the courage to go out but whatever. I cant help it if i was stationed there along with my dad when i was 2.

  • Michelle

    I went today to donate plasma and was also told that due to living in Italy for 5 years previously that I cannot donate. Not only plasma, but blood, or anything. I assume by anything that meant “anything”. What I mean is that I cannot donate organs, (skin is included as it is an organ), eyes, etc. This really sucks since I have always wanted to be an organ donor once I have passed, if possible.
    What I think is worse though, is the fact that we were never informed that we MAY have been exposed. She informed me that during this time the Military had purchesed meat that had tested positive. This meat was served on bases in Europe. Because we lived on the economy, and not on base, thus hardly ever eating on base that we were a much lower risk. However, still a risk. I do not think that I have such disease, but it would have been nice to at least be informed so that we could beaware of things to possibly look for, right! I feel like mooing…

  • Becca

    Yeah I didn’t know I couldn’t give blood either until recently. There was a mad cow outbreak while my dad and our family was stationed in Japan. It sucks but I mean what can you do I’d rather not risk getting some one sick or sicker.

  • Marilyn

    What i find upsettign about this situation is that i was never notified by the army. I served in germany between the specified period and should have been informed. The military knew of this problem in 2001 they should have let everyone who served know about it. Here’s a dod meeting transcript where this subject was discussed.

    http://www.defense.gov/transcripts/transcript.aspx?transcriptid=930

  • HarryH

    This FDA ban is ridiculous. As Dave N. mentioned, Mad Cow Disease is not exclusive to European nations. It’s common here in the states too. I emigrated from Europe when I was a kid in the mid 80′s. I wanted to do something good and donate blood but was turned down because of this “rule”. Oh well, the ones suffering the most are blood banks and the patients who need transfusions. Can’t they just test the donated blood for diseases such as MCD? Does this mean that certain Europeans may die from MCD one day? Come on. Considering that the FDA is a government institution, I bet somebody is profiting on this somewhere. Anyway, that’s my two cents.

  • D McArthur

    I am now living in the USA and today i was told i cannot give blood as i am from the UK, this is despite having given over 60 pints of blood since i was 18…….

  • Mary Anderson

    I served in the military and did my 2 year stint in germany, when i came back i donated plasma (a clinic DR okayed me) i moved and another plasma center told me i could not donate because i was in germany, and the worker after i got added to the banned list told me IF I HAD LIED about my service i would have been able to donate, this donation place that removed me was willing to take blood from drunks and people who stepped out side to smoke blunts or weed, there is definately something wrong with this entire picture..I am a donor and if i have not had symptoms in 20+years you’d think i am not a carrier…

  • Mary Anderson

    I served in the military and did my 2 year stint in germany, when i came back i donated plasma (a clinic DR okayed me) i moved and another plasma center told me i could not donate because i was in germany, and the worker after i got added to the banned list told me IF I HAD LIED about my service i would have been able to donate, this donation place that removed me was willing to take blood from drunks and people who stepped out side to smoke blunts or weed, there is definately something wrong with this entire picture..I am a donor and if i have not had symptoms in 20+years you’d think i am not a carrier…

  • micheleb

    This morning I went to octapharma because I wanted to donate plasma. After an hour spending there answering their questions I got turned away because I lived in Germany almost my whole life. I feel so discriminated! I always donated Plasma in Germany and never had any problems. My husband wich is in the Army donates blood for the red cross and they have no problem that he lived all over the globe. This is so wrong!!

    • Noel

      He may have not been turned away because he served – or lived all over the globe – after the time frame mentioned in the mad cow statement. It is a stupid rule for sure and needs to be updated. Red Cross goes out of their way to update about current mosquito outbreaks but doesn’t bother to update this stigma about mad cow disease France & U.S. has.

  • maryc

    I have to agree with Chris and Dave N. I was a military “dependent” in Italy- now over 25 years ago. I happen to be a vegetarian but was told I could have been exposed “unknowingly.” Ridiculous!

    Shame on the protectionists who for the sake of profit are denying patients access to some of the healthiest blood and organs available. (The military population is generally more fit than the average American.)

    Americans who eat fast food are far more likely to be exposed to mad cow than any vegetarian. We know we have mad cow in America because of it’s prevalence in wild game-its quite common in deer, for example.

    There has never been a case of mad cow that was shown to have been hidden and dormant for decades in someone’s blood, suddenly bursting forth for no apparent reason–but this what we are told to fear.

    Shame on the Red Cross for playing politics as well.

    • Jason in San Diego

      I was born in Germany at a civilian base in 1984. The following year my dad got stationed in the US, and I have been here ever since. I joined the navy in 2003, and after seven deployments in eight years just recently got out. I haven’t had the flu since fifth grade, I don’t get colds, take any medicine, do any drugs or any guys (no offense), I play football and run marathons for fun, and eat healthier than anyone I know. I cannot donate blood or plasma. I found this out today after two hours of sitting in a waiting room, getting my blood tested, getting a urinalysis, and several rounds of questions. Honestly after being in that huge room and seeing the number of overweight, unshowered, disheveled, disgusting people in there I really want to start donating blood an plasma to my own storage vault for me, since I would not take blood or plasma from anyone (out of around 200 people who came in there were three who looked healthy) there excepting those three. I agree with everyone who has stated military people are more likely to have a healthy immune system and take better care of themselves. What bugs me worse than being excluded but not hearing anything from the government about it is when I do research and see the dates of these studies. 1999? 1996? 2002? So a decade with nothing further found??? The FDA study and all info that I have found on the matter is at least a decade old by now, and I just emailed the FDA voicing my concerns and questions concerning this matter. Ten years with no update seems like they came up with a stupid rule, and then quit investigating it so they wouldn’t have to admit they were wrong. If I have had CJD for 28 years with no symptoms or anything, it hasn’t been very well tested, and I have an absolute perfect bill of health then shit, everyone should get CJD. Apparently before it may kill you in it’s 10-40 year incubation period you’ll have a lifetime free from worry about every virus common to man in civilized countries, and be an exceptional athlete. Thank you CJD….(stupid FDA,

      • Lene

        Your correct. My dad was 59 and the healthiest man I knew before diagnoses of CJD which led to his death 5 months later. They have no idea how contracted but possibly through unregulated blood transfusions. It doesn’t show up in your blood but rather stay dormant in the prions in your brain and could stay dormant during your lifetime, but can be genetically passed in to your children and not manifest until later or their kids kids etc. hopefully will be dropped after generations. So your immune system has nothing to do with it. If you are over weight and sick, you are at risk, if you are mr.universe 2012 you are at risk, baby’s, teens, young adult, adults, seniors, your at risk. Doesn’t matter. The government ( my belief) doesn’t make public the cases and potential threats of this because the are in bed with the livestock industry. And it would probably cause loss of profit. The problem is, is that once contracted from tainted meat, it’s then passed though blood or birth. So even though it was originally contracted from forcing cattle to eat cattle in the 80′s and giving the tainted meat to the public, we have not seen its full potential because of the peculiar dormancy stages of the disease. There’s no time limitation on the dormancy either. Could be months, years or never rear it’s ugly head. And since there were no regulations on the blood donors, it could have spread massively unbeknownst to the population. Best practice, if at risk, don’t donate. Find someone who can donate in your place. Or 2 or 3. Keep the blood banks full. But with healthy blood not at risk to spreading a terrible fatal disease.

  • KarenA

    This is nuts, i am one of the healthiest people i know, i am 43 years old and have absolutely no medical issues what so ever… I take no pills… my blood work is picture perfect and has been that way since before I can remember. I grew up in Scotland and moved to the US in 1984. other than perhaps being a mad cow at times i am perfectly healthy… i would think that if there were something wrong it would have shown itself by now??? it’s ridiculous, i have had friends in need of blood but i cannot help out because of this "label"… ubsurd!!! There has to be a dr somewhere that can screen for this so called disease and finally prove that tha majority of us are clear. Can you imagine the amount of blood we could save, there would be NO shortages anywhere… there are a lot of us who would love to help but cannot!!!

    • Lene

      You can’t be tested for it. Not unless your willing to give them a chunk of your brain. And even then, if its in its dormancy stage, it’s undetected. Not until it spontaneously activates, would you ever know you are a carrier. Even if you have the “perfect bill of health”, doesn’t matter. Your at risk if they say your at risk, and thus your putting anyone who is to receive your blood at risk. Why do it? If we have the information ( which if you actually research the disease and not just complain about the bans) , why ignore it? Isn’t this how mass epidemics become mass in the first place? Seriously? It’s the most inhumane thing! I am just shocked that people just complain about bans that save lives from a horrible disease! It like complaining about seat belts in a car or carseats for children. Are you probably going to get into an accident? Prob not. But the risk is there (way higher risk for car accidents than CJD, like probably a million but a risk non the less), just saying. It’s there for your and your loved ones protection. Do the research.

  • Anthony Guidroz

    The more pointed question is why are we not tested for it.
    I was in the Air Force stationed in England from 81 to 83 I needed to donate blood for my Dad for an upcoming surgery back in 88 and I was denied because of the potential for mad cow.
    What is the US Government not telling us?

    • Joe Frederick

      You hit the nail on the head with that question Anthony!! What isn’t the Government telling us, we that have served over seas? I have a lot of health issues and have always wondered what the Government injected me with when I was receiving shots? Hmmmmmm Air Force 1980 to 1983 Germany

  • Len Dillinger

    I agree with the frustrations of everyone above. I served in Italy in the 80′s and my whole family is now indefinitely deferred. I thought the rules about bone marrow and organ donation were less stringent, however. This blind rejection of most of the military is just plain stupid. With the advances in medicine over the past 30 years it is about time some smart researcher resolves this issue once and for all. Maybe instead of developing yet another high-priced designer drug we should fix this problem.

  • Anthony gray

    If that is the case….why are other Americans allowed to donate blood since there have been confirmed cases of mad cow disease in the United States? Does that exclude everyone in this country since these individuals have been diagnosed?
    If a person from the United States moved to another country or Canada let’s say….they wouldn’t be allowed to donate blood since it was confirmed in 2002 or 2003 that the United States had it’s first case of mad cow disease.

  • Anthony gray

    If that is the case….why are other Americans allowed to donate blood since there have been confirmed cases of mad cow disease in the United States? Does that exclude everyone in this country since these individuals have been diagnosed?
    If a person from the United States moved to another country or Canada let’s say….they wouldn’t be allowed to donate blood since it was confirmed in 2002 or 2003 that the United States had it’s first case of mad cow disease.

  • j j

    Just went to donate blood for a friend that was getting a liver transplant. Found out that I am ineligible to donate blood because I served in the army from 1984-1986 and was stationed in germany. How do they determine exactly the years 1980-1996 to be the dates of ineligibility? What are the chances anybody living there has CJD? (human equivalant of mad cow disease). From what I read there are only 2 ways of knowing and only 1 way to know for sure. Last one being an autopsy on your brain, the other a spinal tap that from what I’ve been told is inconclusive. Isn’t there anyway in this day and age of modern medicine a way to tell if you are infected with CJD? I’ve researced and also found that symtoms could occur anywhere from 5-40 years from ever you may have eaten contaminated beef. Plese tell me the FDA is at least trying to figuire out better way to figure out exactly who was infected in any.

  • Eve

    Chernobyl incident anyone?

    • Daniel Castiglione

      Hi. , saw your Chernobyls request and thought I would ask you what you have come up with. I was stationed in BadKissigen,West Germany during that time. I remember the darkened sky and advisorys .yea, we were outside in it. Thanks Dan

  • MichelleC

    No. I’ve recently done research on CJD at university and all findings are STILL inconclusive. There’s no way to test it because the proteins in your brain that make you ill are very nearly identical to the normal proteins in your brain that don’t make you ill. Also there are so few cases of human mad cow disease that they stuggle to do actual research!
    The rule is so stupid. I live in England and can happily give blood over here. Seems stupid that if I moved to USA like I want to I wouldn’t be able to.

  • MKaye1864

    This is bull. Before they came up with this stupid law, I gave blood and was told it was good. I was 2 years old when we left Germany. I didn’t have a choice but to be there and now I am told just because my Dad was in the military, I am now deemed “unclean”. What the heck? Thank God I did not marry a military man. This is stupid. I agree with jj, with the advances in modern medicine, you would think someone, somewhere would know something. I am very frustrated with this.

  • TM

    The reason they don’t test for it is that it can only be reliably be done during an autopsy – you don’t want them to kill you before “donating” blood, do you?
    I was in the wrong place too and so I’ve researched it slightly and it’s really hard to determine anything much about it. Too vague and very unlikely that this is the worst thing that would come from your blood. I thought the NIH said most recently it is NOT transmitted by blood transfusion – doctors doing an autopsy or brain biopsy sound more at risk than anyone else.
    I guess I should tell my children that they can’t donate either, they were little tiny children and probably won’t really be sure what years they lived overseas.

  • Stav

    Hi all
    one of the same, I’m Greek and French 36 y old … been living in Greece and France for the past 35 years of my life… rather cumulative I would say as the requirement suggests …. I’ve been excluded from the American Red Cross for being from Europe (due to the Mad cow desease .. not that I have it). The Australian red cross has only as a requirement the 3 months cumulative presence in the UK and not any other country .. and they are very strict in terms of quarantine procedures. I wonder what is the scientifically proven statistic behind the cause of exclusion from the American red cross or is it maybe the fact that some people do not want to admit that the Mad cow desease also exists in the US and Canada? See the site of CDC for example.
    Anyway I’ve wated for a 1,5 and learned something very useful today … and behind politics this is a real message passing to the world.. you cannot be a blood donator in the US unless you’re American…ha!

  • Tina

    Absolutely ridiculous! I have been back in the States since Jan 1986, but cannot donate blood because I may have Mad Cow…how long does that disease live without symptoms??? Blood donors are few and far between, but because my dad served his country, my blood is not good enough…wow! Does this mean if my child needs a transfusion, I cannot donate????

  • Angi

    I donated during my entire Army career (27+ years) and was just told yesterday that my blood is no good anymore because of serving in Germany from ’86-’89. I would think that if I was exposed to vCJD, the symptoms would have surfaced after 22 years post assignment. It is an absolute shame that so many cannot donate now. Another person mentioned that they were more than likely healthier than someone who had not served. I would have to agree with that statement. Military member’s medical and dental needs/requirements are a priority while serving. This is to ensure a “healthy force” was on hand and available when the nation needed them. I would argue that the benefits of a healthier lifestyle through continuous physical training, immunizations, medical/dental care, drug free lifestyle, etc., one would WANT a military member’s blood before the anonymous donor who walked in off of the street. By the way, I have discovered that although I cannot donate blood, I AM ELIGIBLE to be in the bone marrow program. This is just another way to give a wonderful gift of life to another human being. :)

  • Mike

    I was stationed with the USAF in England from 1989 to 1992 and everytime there is a blood drive I was told the same thing. “Because of Mad Cow Disease and you were stationed in England during those times you can not give blood.” The worst part is I am type O Neg “the universal donor.”

    It is amizing that I want to give blood many times and was turned town even though It has been over 20 years since I was stationed in England.

  • Nicole

    Its sucks here, you are not welcome as a not US-citizien.
    There is not a differents between you guys and us, we are all the same. I gave blood for almost over 8 years and now I cant because of this Creutzfeld Jacob Disease(I dont have it)?
    So, if one of my kids need blood. Im not aloud to give them some? What is that, I dont want that anyone else gives blood to one of my family members. Because I have the bloodtyp for everyong, I dont like this rule. Americans have diseases too!!! I didnt like that nurse either who told me that ” YOU ARE NOT AMERICAN, YOU GOT A DISEASE, WE DONT TAKE BLOOD FROM YOU’ This is b…s… and r…

  • Donna

    Seriously! It sucks you can’t give blood, but, what if you do have this disease? Since the only way you will know is if you become sympomatic and die and then are autopsied. There is no cure!! I am more worried if I infected someone thru blood donation or what if I gave it to my children when I was pregnant. Get a grip people it is not a government conspiricy to keep you from donating blood.

    • Lene

      Thank you for your sanity Donna. Honestly. If your potentially at risk, why potentially put others at risk? If your loved one needs blood find someone who isn’t at risk? Your willing to put your loved one at risk because you think the ban as stupid or discriminative? Too lazy to do research on the disease. I say this as a ” potential carrier, non eligible donor” and I am not mad I can’t donate. I am thrilled I can’t and that there are small bans that I believe need to be further researched and become even more thorough. If you can’t donate, find 2 more in your place that can.

  • Rob

    So what blood do the citizens of Europe use for transfusions? American?

  • N

    I’m in the same boat and it’s ridiculous. I’m a 30 yr old woman, never smoked, drank, or done drugs in my life. Very healthy. I was a military dependent stationed in Italy for 3 years over 20 yrs ago. I now work for the federal govt and the red cross comes to my federal building for blood drives. We are allowed 4 hrs off if we give blood but I can’t because I may have mad cow disease! I used to give blood throughout my high school years(in the US)and it wasn’t a problem until now.

  • rob

    wow there are alot of opinions out there i am a 20 yr vet and yes i served in one of the areas heck hundred of thousands have served in these areas. I agree if this is such a problem that the fda has banned our blood why are we not being informed by the DoD or VA that we were and are at risk for this FDA banned disease. has any of you ask your heath care providers at the VA abbout this. If there is syptoms, how long should we be looking,when will there be test.The big one for me is if my child or spouse needs blood now can i give or should i give. i would say that we need to address this situation not later but now. Call your congressman call the CDC ask your primary care provider. why such a brush off. sounds like we are hiding something. the big one for me is if your a civilain living inthese country youcan go up to five yrs but if you were military its only six months. do they know something i dont, sounds a little familar agent orange, gulf war syndrome. always deny first. i dont know maybe iam being parinode. what do you think

  • justme

    I just hate about this rule, that Rossian people can donate the blood. Only people from europe will understand why. This rule make no sence to me.

  • Super Dave

    So having served on active duty in Italy during this time frame and now learning that I cannot give blood, does this authorize me disability? I was healthy and fine and gave blood all the time before the United States Military stationed me in Italy? We are not being told the entire story here.
    Sad to say, I served honorably and would expect transparency in this situation.

  • H

    I was stationed in Turkey during 1979-80 so was in country the first year of the banned time frame. It has been over 31 years for my “exposure”. I gave blood three times in the late 90s and once in the early 2000s before being told about this. I keep thinking that there must be a time limitation for the vCJD to manifest itself. I would be one of the first to come off this ban but there does not appear to be an expiration date on this ban. Is this going to last forever (until death do us part) or should there be a time limitation and what is it?

  • Graham

    I’m Irish, born and raised in Northern Ireland, and I lived in England for a few years as a student… I can’t even give blood in the Republic of Ireland, yet I can if I cross the border.

    I lived in America for 2 years from 98-2000, and went to give blood on one occasion. I was completely open and up front about my medical history and where I was from, and they had no problem with me giving blood. I’m A-, approx 7% of the population has this blood type, and I’m moving to America soon. I want to give blood, it’s the right thing to do, and any blood tests that I’ve had done have come back clean…

    Thought this might interest you all:
    This article in the medical journal Immunology, also says:

    ‘Gelatins used in vaccines produced in Japan are derived from bovine or porcine sources; all live virus vaccines contain bovine gelatin’

    You read that right, ALL LIVE VIRUS VACCINES CONTAIN BOVINE GELATIN.

    http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2326734

    This article is also worth reading:
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/4736295.stm
    Although written back in 2005, and stating that a new method of cleaning and decontaminating surgical equipment was discovered, the article states that CJD and vCJD could be passed on where a CJD/vCJD infected patient was operated on, the instruments were cleaned, and then used on a non-infected patient…

  • Cynthia Freeston

    After I returned from a two week visit to Greece on January 10, 2012, my bloodbank said I could not donate for a full year. I am curious why this might be.

  • Ken

    So, I just saw on cnn.com that a fourth case of Mad Cow disease has been confirmed in the United States. By the given reason that prevent me from donating blood, does this mean nobody in the United States can donate either?

    How many people are dead or dying because there wasn’t blood available for them to receive. If it were me on the table, I would prefer to take my chances with blood from someone that served overseas 20+ years ago than bleed out.

    It’s time for a change to the policy. How can they not know if blood is tainted? If there are no tests to detect the disease, how do they know if humans have it?

  • What if you lived in europe and were a vegetarian all your life? Or a hindu that does not eat beef? Do they make an allowance for people that have never had a bite of beef in their lives? I agree with everyone; it’s a ridiculous law, we have blood shortages all over this country. Lie and give blood I say. I grew up in the UK and Ireland. On Wednesday Sept 12th 2001 I walked into St Vincents hospital in New York City’s downtown and gave blood. I lied. On the following saturday I gave another pint in the same hospital. I have a rare blood type I knew it would help someone in need. Fek these FDA guys. The same people that have allowed “pink slime” to be fed to our children for years (Google it).

    • Lene

      Once contracted it can be passed genetically. And because its only prevalent in prions in the brain, it does it show up in blood work. I know this because I am a 26 yr old vegetarian who’s father died from this disease in 2011. The thing is is that I believe it to be more prevalent than presumed. So if your put in the time and place for at risk and are asked not to donate, please don’t. Doesn’t mean you have it, but also doesn’t mean that your not at risk for it or at risk for giving it to others though blood transfusions. My dad never was in Europe but had blood transfusions before any regulations of this sort. He also could have contracted it through tainted meat. No one knows. The point is why risk it? If you could potentially be a carrier to a fatal disease that can be passed through blood, why donate? Rally up others who can donate in your place, which is what I do. I would never want to be responsible to even risk anyone to this horrible disease.

  • Leann

    I was stationed in Germany for the last 8 months of 1990. That’s the last year of the ban, and I missed the 6 month cut-off by 2 lousy months. I’m disheartened, and check back often to see if the restrictions have lifted or been modified some since the years are ticking by and there has not been, to my knowledge, a mass mad cow outbreak among Europeans and/or Americans who served there. I’m only 41, maybe before I die, (hopefully not of mad cow… LOL) I’ll be able to donate again. :)

  • sara

    Actually if you’ve lived in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany, you can now donate. You just need proof of where you lived between 1980 and 90. The cases in those countries started in the 90′s so if you didn’t live there in the 90′s you’re set.

  • Leo

    Just wanted to save some lives today because apparently some blood donors are needed, but because of the fact that I was raised in France i was turned down. Stupid rule knowing that if I had mad cow disease i would probably have died already since last found was more than 10 years ago plus it was never proven that it could transmit through blood. Plus MCD didn’t stop at US borders so technically noone here should be allowed to donate blood, and finally how do they think people in europe get their blood supply ?! I am really mad and feel discriminated, seems like only american people can donate blood. My girlfriend’s father who was born in Spain and moved in the US in 1981 donated blood to the American red cross every time he could ever since he arrived and was turned down of his good civic duty this year because of this stupid rule. I really hope they realise someday how stupid they are given that America is a country based on immigration and that blood supply would go up if they just let go of that. All they’re afraid of is liability and the stupid suing-minded americans.

  • I spent 7 years in Germany with various units, field artillery, Infantry and can someone answer mywhy I was allowed to donate blood at the GRB here in Houston the day after 9-11 but a couple of years ago I got turned down at the Toyota center during a Houston Rockets promotion? Never saw hide nor hair of any mad cows over there

  • Lark

    My brother in law, who was in the Army and stationed in Germany for three years beginning in 1989, recently died and was precluded from corneal, skin and organ donation for the same reason. Seems somewhat far-fetched since his healthy organs and body tissues could have eased suffering/saved lives.

  • Trey

    Just don’t tell them.

  • Linda Carol

    What I find that is really disturbing is that I donated for 10-12 years — regularly — before they figured this out. Are those people supposed to be ineligible now . . . and how on earth would they know? I don’t even know. Some of them were newborn babies with the rh-negative factor. How on earth would they know? And what has happened to all those people who got my blood? ????????

  • Brenda

    This has been frustrating for me also…I served in the UK in the late 80′s in the US Navy…..must have donated at least 4-6 times back in the States while still in the military…..went to donate blood with my son who was doing it for the first time in 2010 and that’s when I found out I couldn’t donate….I almost cried…I consider it an honor and a priviledge to be able to donate blood…no I don’t want to infect anyone if I have mad cow disease, but if it’s so fatal, how come all of us that are risky haven’t died yet….and like one person already said, where does Europe get their blood from…if they can screen donated blood for HIV, why can’t they screen it for mad cow disease????

  • Alice

    We lived in Germany for 3 years from 1988-1991 and are among those who are prohibited from giving blood. I realize they have not yet figured out a test for the prions, but the question I really want answered is this: Has there been even ONE case of a military member, civilian employee, or family member associated with the military who has developed this disease in the 20+ years since being in Europe? I can’t find any information even hinting that one single person in that category ever developed the disease. I would wager that someone in need of my O neg blood would gladly take the chance that my blood would help them.

    I get really tired of hearing the Red Cross appeals for more donors, but they have set up a structure to prohibit donations from thousands of people who would be willing to give.

  • Cindy

    REALLY!!! I was stationed in turkey for 2 years from 1983-1985 while I was in the Air Force. I went to give blood a few days ago and was shocked when they told me I couldn’t donate because I lived there for 2 years. Why didn’t the military ever mention it to us. It is obviously a big deal since a lot of us are permanently BANNED from ever giving blood to help others that need it. Makes me wonder if I will contract this so-called disease. If so, what’ s the military going to do about it? It really is a shame that the govt couldn’t notify it’s servicemen and women that put their lives on the line to protect our countries freedom. What kind of freedom is this? I donated plasma in the 90′s with no problem, so why the problem now? Too much politics and not enough common sense.

  • Mary

    And what’s even more infuriating is that they stopped serving british beef in military dining facilities in 1980 but kept selling it in commissaries for another 16 years?! They didn’t stop selling it in commissaries until 1996. So, that tells me that if the person serving in the military had their families with them, you are at even higher risk of having been exposed. My husband was station in Germany and Italy during the time period in question and I was with him with my two young daughters. Way to take care of military families overseas!! What recourse will my surviving dependents have if I die of this disease? The US Government?

  • ntoonz

    I understand the restrictions, but it bugs me when they get on the radio and complain about how low their blood supplies are. Perhaps if you weren’t summarily rejecting a large swath of the population willing to donate blood, you’d have a larger supply, don’t you think? Can’t have it both ways. Fix the problem or keep cutting us out and quit whining about it.

  • James

    I have O Neg and I feel for the babies who need the O neg blood to survive,and there are thousand of Service members who was station oversea during the 1980-1990 time frame, and they are still alive and well, and it been over 20 some years since that happen. your loss RED CROSS so you need to pressure the FDA TO LIFT THE BAN.

  • Rose

    I too lived with my family in Europe(Germany) serving as a DOD civilian from 1974-1998. Since this ban includes my entire family of 4 as well as my teacher friends who also taught for DOD, their families, and any military member as well as their families – has any one ever considered setting up a blood bank for those who fall in this category? – My family and I have been in the US for 14 years and think that since there are no reported cases of Mad Cow Disease being transmitted via blood transfusion, we would be willing to take a chance on “2nd class” blood donated by others who are in a similar situation and have a similar amount of time since returning from Europe. This would relieve pressure on the blood banks who are constantly begging for blood donations.

  • sandy

    i lived in England during the ‘contaminating time’ so understand that i am not allowed to donate blood. Does anyone know if this also means that my children are unable to donate blood in the future? I wasnt living in England when pregnant and they were born in Australia.

  • Beth

    This is so stupid! We were stationed in the UK from May of 1996 to May of 2004, so our whole family (all six of us) are banned from donating blood, plasma, etc. I haven’t heard of this applying to organ donation however. My husband and I were both extensively tested as possible kidney donors for my brother-in-law. We were both OK’d as donors. What really frustrates me is that there has NEVER been a case of this disease being transmitted to humans by blood transfusion. The British Red Cross would gladly take all the blood we wanted to donate while we were there. I guess it’s OK for the military to spill their blood for the protection of those who make these ludicrous laws as long as we don’t get any of it on them while doing so.

    • Lene

      Please stop! My father died from CJD. It is a real and serious threat. And just because you presume you are healthy does not mean that you are not a carrier and is just in its dormancy stage which can actually last the remainder of your life if you are fortunate. You have a child I am assuming by your photo. They are at risk too. It’s so foolish and selfish to think yourself as unaffected or not eligible for this type of disease and potentially pass it on because you believe the bans to be “stupid”. We don’t know how my father contracted the disease but he had blood transfusions during a period when they were unregulated. That being said, I as his daughter could have contracted it now genetically. And it may stay dormant through my lifespan. But as a potential carrier ( always potentially and never diagnosed until symptoms and still not official until autopsy since they have to dissect it from the brain and can’t do it while your alive) I would never ever put someone at risk of it. It’s the most awful disease I have ever witnessed. Please for your and your family’s sake do further research before complaining about a ban that’s put there for your protection. By the way, it doesn’t show up in the blood work. It’s dormant. It sits in the prions in your brain tissue which is why there is little to no research done on it. So the people that are carriers would never be able to tell they are carriers until it manifests and beyond that still, until they can have access to your brain tissue. My father donated his body to the Prion Society of MN to help further the research. He was not allowed a regular burial or funeral because of the contamination. I am not complaining, I would never want to be responsible for this terrible disease in anyone else’s life.

  • Debbie

    I work in a large hospital based blood donor center. I realize the frustration of people who want to donate, but because they served in the military or were born in these countries, they are not allowed. The United States government was not aware of bovine spongiform encephalopathy disease or “mad cow” until the early 90′s. The only way to diagnose this disease is deep brain biopsy done post mortem. Just because there have never been cases “recorded” of this disease, does’nt mean it can’t happen. The deal is , we really don’t know how the disease is contracted except by eating diseased beef. The FDA has rules and I would rather err on the side of caution than expose very ill patients to “uncertain” blood products. I am not able to donate blood myself, but I try to recruit as many donors as possible. If you are not able to donate blood, I encourage you to set up a blood drive or volunteer to help with one!

    • Lene

      Thank you! I cried when I read this. My father died from this disease and I stumbled upon this blog and was horrified at the general disregard for the meaning of the bans. Your comment was one of the ones that is both safe and a solution to the need to donate. Thank you so much. I can’t tell you how painful it was to watch a loved one die before your eyes in such a way that would break the strongest of men. I understand that I am not alone in this. And people have lost in more painful ways. But when I saw all the complaints about not being candidates I couldn’t be silent. If I could save anyone’s family from this terrible disease, I would. Thank you from the bottom of my heart.

    • Sami

      Debbie: Lene’s father’s death is a tragedy, but what freaks me out is that he could’ve been donating blood for years. What safeguards are there in place in the US for protecting people from “uncertain” blood donated by american donors with dormant CJD?

  • Michael Fredericks

    Does anyone know if VA has declared the vCJD blood donor deferral a valid VA disability claim? I gave blood on a regular basis when I went into the military and then I go on a 4-year overseas assignment (1985-1989) to Brussels Belgium, and I come back not being able to donate blood. I was originally told I had a 3 year deferral when I came back and it’s going on 23 years as of today. This indefinite deferral has become a permanent deferral. VA needs to be compensating all the military who fall under this category of service. Losing the right to give blood because you served your country in a location with vCJD issues deserves some sort of compensation.

  • Bob

    I’m in the same situation as many of you. I stationed in Belgium for from 1980-82. For the longest while I was a regular blood product (platelets/whole blood). I was up to approximately 6-7 gallons of blood product. To find this new ineligibility really had me concerned. Just because I MAY be carrying some human variant of mad cow disease? Give me a break! But I suppose the FDA & CDC do have to air on the side of caution when it comes to the safety of the national blood supply. The last thing I’d want to do is make someone sick due to one of my blood product donations.

  • Ole

    I too would like to give blood but can’t.

    I was born and lived in Denmark from 1965-1996 before moving to Houston, Texas, where I’ve been ever since.

    It’s funny that CDC (Center for Disease Control) acknowledge that there are MCD right here in the US, yet, this ridiculous ban of Europeans is still in effect.

    Here’s a link: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/bse/

  • James

    I am flabbergasted at the level of suspicion I see on this simple question. Beign that MCD can manifest for greater than 15 yrs prior to showing symptoms is a good enough reason to be cautious. The person on here that made the claims, “military are good enough to spill their blood, but not donate it”…get over yourself buddy. I was active for 17+ years, and lived in several of the countries as a dependent and as active duty and do not take offense to it at all. Sounds like a lot of people on here want NO precautions. Screw it, got HIV? MCD? Hepatitus…go ahead and donate your infected blood to put someone in a bad situation into a worse one.

    Damn. Thanks for your service, but quit bitching about blood donation precautions.

  • Lene

    Can I just say something? I am from the US. My dad was diagnosed with CJD in April 2011 and died in September 2011. I watched his bodily rapidly break down. He was 59, and prior to his symptoms was one of the healthiest people I know. Worked out every day, extremely fit, extremely intelligent, no signs of sickness. He started getting headaches which he thought was probably an untreated ear infection and when all tests failed they finally did a cat scan that showed his brain was swelling. Then 2 months of testing at the Mayo clinic to diagnosis of CJD but unofficial until an autopsy which later became official diagnoses. I stumbled upon this because I am researching the disease for my sake and publics sake. PLEASE follow the rules. They are there for a reason! Stop complaining about not being able to be a donor! How selfish! You could be a carrier and the symptoms may never surface or stay dormant during you lifespan. And you’d pass it in to another who could potentially die from this! Losing my dad was hard, the shock of something so unheard of or talked about, and the duration of 5 months of watching him suffer with no cure to be had was harder. He donated his body to the Prion society of MN for further research. I am not trying to get sympathy. I am trying to make public awareness. PLEASE FOLLOW THE RULES! THEY ARE FOR YOUR AND YOUR LOVED ONES PROTECTION!

    • Sami

      Most likely your dad got it from a blood donation from a US donor. There have been cases of CJD in the USA (just like the one you just mentioned), but no blood donation restrictions whatsoever.

      Meanwhile, there are many European countries that have had fewer or no cases of CJD, yet they are on this ban list. It could be argued that blood from donors from those countries is likely to be “cleaner” than average blood in a US blood bank.

      I think you should be extremely bothered by the fact that your dad was eligible to donate blood until the day CJD was diagnosed. There are probably many similar cases around – american carriers who don’t know about it and donate blood. THIS is the real issue here. The current rules didn’t protect your dad, and don’t protect anyone else either.

      • Lene

        Sami- I 110% agree that the admission/denial of donor candidates needs to be more thorough. There’s no way of knowing if my father was infected from blood or beef. (Us had the same practices as uk, Usda stepped in after multiple mad cow disease cases, but tainted beef was still consumed and I fear we are still unaware of the future consequences of both a failed usda system and failed blood donor guidelines). My father never donated his blood. I asked him while he was still coherent. The problem is, yes, he could have if he wanted to and risked others unknowingly, but there would have been no way to test him for it. Infact, when he was going through extensive testing prior to diagnosis, they were aware that it could potentially be cjd but the odds (from the doctors mouth at mayo) were one in a million and it was more likely something else. Even after ruling every other disease out, they still couldn’t diagnose it as CJD officially until his autopsy, since the only way to officially test is with brain matter. I fear though, that cjd is more prevalent than the public believes and that there are many “carriers” who are just in their dormancy stage, and/or misdiagnoses (early Alzheimer’s can be similar) both from blood transfusions and beef consumption. That’s why I urge people to not donate if there is even the slightest chance. I will tell my kids’s / kid’s , but hopefully there will be more research or a different way to test if you are a carrier or not. For now, because his autopsy was also inconclusive as to if it was genetic or not (there are different types of cjd and he could have been born which puts family members at risk, or contracted it after he became a dad,usually the way the holes form in the brains will point to genetic or other, And I or my sisters can’t be tested for it without a lobotomy and even then it would have to be active and not in it’s dormancy stage to show up) I am not required to put it on my health records and I am “allowed” to donate blood. I however refuse to donate and tell my doctors or anyone else who could come in contact with my blood, body fluids the family history. Even though the odds are I am not a carrier, I would never gamble anyone else’s life out of my own selfishness even if it’s 1 in a million. My family has lost at those odds before. Until I can 100% be proven to not be a carrier, I will never donate. I find it heart wrenching that I can donate under the us guidelines. I just keep researching and trying to help others awareness so hopefully others won’t have to be at risk.

        • Lene

          I should also mention that originally I thought I was inelligable as a donor seeing as my dad died from it, but upon further research there are no restrictions for family history, at least not that I am seeing when going to American Red Cross or plasma donor pages to see. Hopefully I am missing it but I couldn’t find anything but times frames and locations. Again, I will never donate until I can be reassured I am not a carrier.

  • Lorraine

    I moved to US from UK in 1993, and accept that we cannot donate blood.
    My husband passed away in November 2011, just shy of his 59th birthday. He always carried a donor card, and immediately following his death I began a conversation with NJ Sharing Network. It was about 25 minutes into the conversation, after rattling off his medical history, medications, hospital stays, during a very emotional time, that I was asked if he had lived in UK during a certain time period in the 80s…perhaps the question was more specific,as far as dates are concerned, and of course when the reply was yes, I was thanked most profusely but told they could not use my late husband’s organs. I understand, but please, please, ask the questions that might eliminate a person FIRST, to save unnecessary questions, and yes time and heartache at such a painful time.

  • Aga

    I’ll tell you what I find interesting: according to wikipedia, there has been 3 cases of vCJB in United States, while in my country, where I was raised(Poland) – none, yet I am banned from donating blood in United States. I can understand trying to protect patients, but this math doesn’t make sense.

    • Aga

      misspeling: I meant vCJD

    • Lene

      I wouldn’t rely on Wikipedia for medical information. I don’t know the USA statistic officially, but what I do know is that in talks with the nurses that cared for my father while he was in hospice ( infected with CJD) I asked if they had ever seen any other cases since it was such a rare disease. The head nurse told me she had seen 2 other cases so my dad would make 3. ( my dad- male-59, a woman in her 30′s, and a 16yr old boy) I cannot remember exactly how many years she worked there, I believe around 10. I live in MN, USA. In the state of Mn there were only 2 hospices that would actually take my dad as a patient due to the fact that he had CJD, and needed specific care and after death procedures so as not to contaminate, so I would gather that’s why in that hospice alone there were 3 reported cases. I also have been doing research since losing my dad, and have come across numerous victims (far more than 3) and victims family members reaching out and talking about this. I agree that the math doesn’t add up,but the rules are not only to protect others but also to protect you should you ever need to be on the receiving end, and I am sorry you cannot donate. I would urge you then if you are passionate about giving blood in help for others, to find eligible donors to donate in your place.

      • Karen

        message to Lene,
        There are hundreds of people on the CJD Awareness facebook group from the USA who have lost loved ones to CJD, almost daily someone is joining this group. For more info on this terrible disease look up justice4andy.com and this new book ‘Who Killed my Son’ by Christine Lord available on Amazon ebooks.

  • cat

    Someone needs to get off their duff and find a way to test the blood supply for this vCJD! I, too was overseas as USN, living in Italy during said time frame as was my spouse. When we came back to the states, I found out sooner than spouse that I was ineligible to donate blood – ever, given that I was there during that time. My spouse had donated at other locations due to the fact he was working for a different company than I was and said that question never came up, prior to his giving blood. Forward to 2013, where I came across someone in the medical field that proudly claimed that they were over there in the highth of the “mad cow” disease yet was unaware of the blood donor restrictions. How is that possible for someone in the medical field to be unaware of this – in 2013? Hmm, guess it depends on what organization was collecting the blood, perhaps? So, I believe many are still giving blood to this day and others have been told they can’t, so evidently the blood supply can still be tainted and some are getting/giving blood that shouldn’t. C’mon, whoever is ultimately responsible – either rule us in or rule us out and be consistent about it and as some have said, quit whining about the lack of participant donors and supply as many more of us are are wanting to give but want to do the right thing – to “possibly” prevent others from getting it but who’s to know if no one seems to have the wherewithall to test?????

  • Todd Alex

    I can not believe that anyone would even question the fact of whether they can give blood or not… You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to know that once you leave the U.S. things are different, extremely different in some places. Yes, I’m grateful for all the service men and women, but that doesn’t mean we waive the rules for you. My daughter has had several surgeries and will have several more throughout her life time, its ‘somewhat’ comforting to know they have strict guidelines on blood donors. But then again, there are those ‘self absorbed’ people that want to ‘feel good’ about themselves by saying “I’m a blood donor”. Its okay if you can’t give; find another way to give of yourself. Serve dinner at a homeless shelter, volunteer at a library or retirement home.

  • Emma

    I am from Western Europe and have donated blood and plasma in my own country since I met the age requirement.
    When I lived in the United States, I was told I couldn’t donate because of the mad cow disease thing.

    First of all, DO NOT LIE about it. It doesn’t matter if you think the rule is ridiculous, never lie about anything when donating. The doctors need to prevent ‘bad blood’ being given to a patient, and if something does go wrong, they need to be able to track it down.

    Second, there should be more research on whether this rule should be upheld or not. There have been BSE and vCJD cases in the US as well. In my country, there have been no reported vCJD cases (and yes, I do know that some cases may have gone unreported).

    And, mainly aimed at Todd Alex: exactly what do you think Western Europe is like? When I first arrived in the US, my new friends asked me if we had cars, highways, cell phones, internet, electricity, trees… Someone thought he had to explain Google to me. Western Europe is a ‘modern’, educated place. I did not grow up sleeping in a barn with hundreds of infected cows.

  • anonymous

    Funny thing the first time I ever donated blood they never had these restrictions and donated up until 2003 I want to say.
    I lived in Germany from 1982 to 1994 roughly and have always donated before they changed this.

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